Can you feel the ground beneath your feet?

Below is a video by Klaus Sports Chiropractic showing the effect shoes have on the newest walkers. Aside from being ridiculously cute, the video shows that shoes take away propreception. The soles of your feet are very sensitive to touch because they have a high concentration of nerve endings, similar to your hands, tongue, and nose. When this poor kid had all the sensory input from their feet blocked off with thick shoes, they had no sense of their body position in relation to the ground. I love how they tried to take the shoes off! – an obvious solution.

At the same time that the above video made its way into one of my feeds, so too did the below picture of some running shoes. I mean honestly, they look almost nothing like a human foot, its like its designed to impede movement. You won’t get much sensory inout from these. Walking around barefoot is not practical, but we need to move away from these massive soles, they don’t help human movement and we end up adapting our natural human movement to suit the shoe, rather than the shoe suiting human movement. Once you’ve gone far enough down the massive sole path you’ll have forgotten your natural running gait (it can be re-learned) and you’ll have to buy shoes like the ones below, to help solve the problems that you created by wearing shoes like the ones below, its a vicious cycle.

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Lets make sure you can feel nothing

 

Race Review : KBC 10k Halloween Night Run

I haven’t taken part in an organised run since I did the Virgin Media Night Run in April 2017. I still run regularly, but running in events has been the big casualty of becoming a Dad, its just hard to find the time to stick to a full training plan in order to be able to safely take part in running events.

I was informed of the KBC Halloween Night Run with lots of advance notice, so I had time to create and stick to a full training plan. It felt good to make running the priority in my training schedule again. I felt that getting race fit again elevated all my training. I felt generally healthier, or as John Tarrent refers to it, “the magnificent feeling of well being”.

As for the race itself, it was well organised. Sign up was done easily online and race numbers were available for collection the day before the race and on race day. There was also a well managed and supervised bag drop.

The Halloween theme made for a fun race. Not everyone opted to dress up but there was a few people in costumes. I went for a running friendly Thor costume. Fair play to the person in the inflatable t-rex costume. It was an interesting course, around a GAA pitch and out onto the beach in Sandymount. I don’t think I’ve ever run in a beach race before. The full moon added to the atmosphere. There was one bottleneck at the switchback where runners had to pass single file, this was annoying as you had to stop running and walk through, and it would be the first thing I’d try to change if the organisers run this event and course again.

The course was 5km long, and those doing the 10k ran a second lap. There was a huge drop out rate after the first lap which made for a lonely second lap, I’m glad I was running with a group.

Overall, my criteria for a successful race, whether running alone or in a group: have fun, run as fast as you can, but as slow as you need to, and finish the race with enough left in the gas tank to be able to run another mile. This was a successful race and definitely worth running.

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Race completed
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Superhero landing
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Nice medal

 

What shoes should I be wearing

“Get out of those corsets, they’re killing you”

– Catherine Beecher

Catherine Beecher lived during the 19th century and is mostly know as a proponent of education for women. The quote above is directed towards physical health rather than education. In Catherines time, corsets were tight, and designed to hold and shape the torso of women into a more desirable, aka fashionable, shape. Without question, these 19th century corsets were not good for your health. Using an item of clothing to re-shape your body to something other than its natural shape is a bad idea.

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Today I’d say, “get out of those shoes, they’re killing you“. Shoes started out as a means to protect your feet, and your feet do need protection. But we’ve flattened our world. Gone are the rough and rugged terrains we used to wander, replaced by flat footpaths and flat floors. Even as the ground beneath our feet has gotten flatter, the soles on our shoes have gotten larger. How much protection do you need from a flat surface?

The modern shoe is not a functional item, its a fashion item, and it re-shapes your foot to something other than its natural shape in the name of aesthetics. Most day to day footwear is harmful. Men have it bad, women have it worse, high heels anyone?

Most running shoes are harmful too. Gift wrapping your feet in fully padded, air pumped trainers will disrupt the natural biomechanics of your run and do harm to more than just your feet, it will ricochet upwards to your knees and hips.

The new normal is to have shoe shaped feet, instead of feet shaped shoes. This needs to change. The number one priority of your shoes should be function, not fashion. If you’re interested, these are what I wear. These guys also make nice children’s shoes, Anna and Paul

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Feet shaped shoes or shoe shaped feet
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Took this from NatGeo’s insta page – an Ashaninka Indian. Human feet shaped by nature

 

A failed Race Review

“Take care of your body, it’s the only place you have to live”

– Jim Rohn

Last year I signed up the Glen to Glen Half Marathon. I had a date clash so I wasn’t able to take part but the organiser , in a very kind gesture, allowed me to defer my entry. When I saw the 2018 race date go live I decided I’d take part. My big training casualty since having a baby was long distance runs. The last half-marathon I did was the Disneyland Paris Half Marathon in 2016. To get race fit I started training 17 weeks before race day, which equals 51 runs in total.

My training started well. Unfortunately pressures at work and at home, combined with some freakishly bad weather put a halt to my training for just over 3 weeks. I had a 17 week training plan but I would have preferred 18 weeks. Adding in the missed weeks of training brought my prep time down from a desired 18 weeks, to a mere 14 weeks. And not 14 consecutive weeks, 14 broken weeks. I decided that this wasn’t enough time. You have to gradually condition yourself for long races. I’ve taken part in Half Marathons were people have died. You can’t enter a half marathon in some European countries without a doctors cert to say you are capable. Improperly trained and you could drop dead (worst case) or do long term wear and tear damage to your body (best case). Always, always, always train appropriately for a long race. Unfortunately this is one race I won’t be taking part in. Be aware of what you can do, what you will be able to do in time, and what you can’t do right now. Don’t try and smash through your limitations, gradually push back your limitations with consistent training. There are no quick wins.

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I can’t run in this

 

 

Glimpse into my training

I’m often asked what exercises I do. I take it as a compliment. For someone in their 30’s with a 9 to 5 desk job I’m in reasonably good shape. But the answer is never straight forward, I do lots of things, and when my answer gets more complicated than, “this is leg day, this is chest day”, I think people stop listening. So I decided to capture a typical two weeks of my training in the below 3 mins and 30 second video. I try to keep my workouts varied and interesting. Across the 2 weeks I did 18 separate workouts, and missed 4. When planning the week ahead I always plan a perfect week. A prefect week is very rare, life gets in the way. During the two week period that I captured in the video below my wife went away for a few days, my son got sick, and I had important lunch time meetings. Some workouts had to be dropped, and others had to swap places. Don’t stress over missed workouts, and keep the timetable flexible. The perfect week is there to be aspired to, making it a reality is less important. 18 workouts might seem like a lot, but some are only 20mins long. Not every session has to be an hour long with full intensity. A good workout is more about the quality of the movement than its length or intensity. I’m not telling you how you should workout, I’m just showing you what I do and hopefully you’ll find it useful for creating your own goals.

Race Review: RunDisney Virtual Running Shorts

During the summer I ran the RunDisney Virtual Running Shorts. The RunDisney events are great races, but because I don’t live in California, Florida, or France, they are expensive to get to, and usually involve the planning of a holiday around the race date. Previously I’ve taken part in the 2016 RunDisney Paris half-marathon as well as the 2012 and 2014 Walt Disney World half-marathons.

The RunDisney Virtual Shorts event consists of three 5k races, one in June, one in July, and one in August. Registration is done online and you pick your own date and location to complete your 5k races. So you don’t need to travel at all if you don’t want to. Race Bibs can be printed online, and once you complete your race, you can enter your times online to get your finisher certificate. Finisher Medals are sent out in the post. You can sign up for as many or as few of the races as you want, but you get a bonus “Series” medal if you run all three races. Everything is done on the honor system.

The whole process is very easy, from sign up, to printing bibs and certs, to getting the medals delivered. Typical Disney efficiency. No doubt Disney make money from this but its a great initiative all the same. Its a great way to motivate people to get active over the summer. I had fun picking locations and routes.

Without a fixed race date it is easy to let the race slip. I ran the August race in September because I, and my fellow runners, had difficultly finding a date that suited everyone. This isn’t ideal but sometimes life gets in the way. Other than the August run slipping into September everything went well and I enjoyed the RunDisney Virtual Running Shorts. I would do it again, and I’d recommend it if you and your friends / family are looking for an excuse to have an active Summer 2018. Getting fit and active with a bit of Disney motivation.

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June Run
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July Run
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August (aka September) Run
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Medals!!

Race Review: Wild Air Run

On Saturday, August 5th, I took part in the Wild Air Run in Marley Park. I did this race last year too. It seemed almost identical to last year. 5k of running, with some inflatable obstacle courses along the way. Its a fun run, not to be taken too seriously, and it delivered on that. It helped that the weather was good.

The sign up process is easy, its all done online and you get a QR code to be shown on the day in order to get your race number. The queue to get your race number moves fast, but got very long at times. When you’re not running, maybe before you’ve started or after you’ve finished, they have a chill zone with seats, a coffee stand, smoothie stand, and hot dog stand, and a free glass of milk from event sponsor Avonmore.

There are things that could be improved upon. Some of the obstacles briefly deflated, one I was on at the time, a long queue develops for the last obstacle, and the website FAQ didn’t mention if they have a bag-drop (they do). But this is me looking for problems. Its a great event.

My race time? Who knows, who cares, its not timed. Just go out and have fun. Here is 5 mins and 42 seconds of inflatable madness.

Race Review: Virgin Media Night Run

On Sunday the 23rd of April I ran the Virgin Media Dublin Night Run. I ran in this race series a few years ago when it was called the Samsung Night Run, and excited by the prospect of a new route, new medal design, and a new commemorative tee shirt, I signed up again.

The online registration was easy, Virgin couldn’t have designed an easier to use website. Event communication was timely and clear, with three days available to collect your race pack in Trinity Sports Centre. Race pack collection was also easy as Virgin had placed floor markers guiding you from the Sports Centre Entrance, to race pack collection, and back out again, a nice touch.

On race day, I had planned on running the race in about 60 minutes so I tried to find my way to that section on the starting line, but bad sign-posting meant I found my way to the 45-55mins group. Thats not a big issue as I’ve only rarely seen race organisers enforce this and most runners don’t seem to care. Its the one thing and only thing that could be improved on.

The course was enjoyable, it was a nice way to see Dublin at night. As with all races it was packed at the beginning but thinned out slightly as the race went on, it was never lonely. I ran a respectably 59 minutes and 7 seconds. Maybe I could have improved on that time had I not stopped to take photos, but half the fun of these races is enjoying the sights and sounds. If you’ve not done this race, its one for the list. Below are a few photos I took during the race, trying my best to capture the beauty of Dublin at night.

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Conference Centre
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The Spire. Bit disappointing it was not lit up
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GPO – lit up in red
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The Custom House
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Samuel Beckett Bridge
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Bord Gais Energy Theatre

My Shoe collection

All my shoes are made by VivoBarefoot. They say we are in the second barefoot revolution. The first revolution took place a number of years ago when minimalist and barefoot shoe brands started gaining popularity, but the revolution seemed to end in lawsuits against shoe makers and injured runners. We are now in the 2nd barefoot revolution as minimalist shoe brands are again gaining popularity, only this time there is a greater level of education among the wearers. Runners sustained injuries the first time around mostly because of a lack of education and small bit of arrogance. Runners don’t want to be told that a lifetime of wearing an inch of rubber beneath your feet has warped your natural stride into an unnatural one. In contrast, todays barefoot runners seek advice from professional running coaches before running in minimalist runners. I recommend these coaches.

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My shoe collection

Reading up on the subject of running is likely to lead you to a large and confusing array of articles and publications that will range from telling you that you’ll be running ultra-marathons with ease the day after you go barefoot, to the other extreme that you’ll lose the ability to ever run again such is the destructive force of barefoot running. Articles like this one make me want to steer clear of too much reading. The best thing you can do is to try yourself.

I’m absolutely not a running coach but I can tell you the benefits I’ve experienced after I switched my running and everyday footwear to Vivo shoes. This is of course anecdotal and applies to me, I can’t speak for others:

  • increased toe dexterity – my toes move much more than before
  • better proprioception through my feet – I didn’t notice this until a day when I had to wear “normal” shoes and the lack of feedback I was getting from my feet about the surface I was on was unnerving
  • Stronger soles – the soles of my feet are just tougher
  • No more knee pain – I used to be immobile on the coach the day after a race. I’ve never experienced this since I started wearing minimalist runners.

I do think the term “barefoot” is off-putting and misleading. As you can see from the photo, I’m anything but barefoot, I have 5 pairs of shoes. I don’t walk around outside in my bare feet, even in my house I usually wear socks. What I am doing is wearing shoes designed around the shape and movement patterns of the human foot, shoes that have a wide toe box, and a thin, flat sole. I’m so pleased with my Vivo’s, I even invested a small amount with them when they were crowdfunding, see this article.

 

 

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